Major Lobes of the Cerebrum - Frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and temporal lobe

Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia and Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

Neonatal asphyxia occurs when an unborn baby doesn’t get enough oxygen. This can be due to many factors, including umbilical cord compression or prolapse, excessive contractions, or issues related to medical malpractice (like a physician’s failure to appropriately handle fetal distress). Neonatal asphyxia can cause a severe lack of oxygen to the baby’s brain, which can injure brain cells and cause hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), cerebral palsy, seizures, and other forms of brain damage. Other terms used for neonatal asphyxia may include perinatal asphyxia, birth asphyxia, intrapartum asphyxia, neonatal encephalopathy, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy; however, each term has its own unique meaning.

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What Causes Birth Asphyxia?

Inside the womb, oxygen-rich blood from the mother travels through the placenta and then to the baby through a vein in the umbilical cord. Blood vessels that run between the uterus and placenta, called the uteroplacental circulation, act in a manner similar to the lungs; gas exchange takes place in these vessels. The flow of blood to the baby moves from the maternal circulation to the uterus, then to the placenta (uteroplacental circulation), through the umbilical cord, and finally into fetal circulation.

Anything that affects this blood flow can impact the baby’s oxygenation. Thus, if the mother’s blood pressure drops or there are problems with the uterus (womb), placenta, or umbilical cord, the baby may experience birth asphyxia. In certain cases, such as a complete placental abruption or umbilical cord compression, the baby can be completely deprived of oxygen-rich blood and will then have to rely on fetal reserves. Instances such as these are obstetrical emergencies and the baby must be delivered right away before the oxygen deprivation causes brain damage.

Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia and Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

Anything that affects standard maternal-fetal blood flow can impact the baby’s oxygenation and cause HIE

Common causes of birth asphyxia include:


The Short-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia

A condition known as hypoxia is an early stage of birth asphyxia. Hypoxia is characterized by insufficient oxygen levels in the blood and tissues. Carbon dioxide levels in the fetus will also increase, which is known as hypercarbia. When hypoxia occurs, the fetus begins to generate energy without oxygen, in a process known as anaerobic metabolism. This process, as well as others occurring when the baby is oxygen-deprived, cause lactic acid to build up in the baby’s blood. The high carbon dioxide level along with the lactic acid build-up cause the baby to have acidosis, a condition characterized by acidic blood. Acidosis and hypoxia can cause decreased heart function, which can cause the baby to have very low blood pressure (hypotension) and decreased blood flow to the brain (ischemia).

The insufficient oxygen level caused by the birth asphyxia causes ischemia, and the ischemia causes further hypoxia. Hypoxia and ischemia cause a series of events that disrupt the energy pathways in the cells, which leads to even further brain cell injury. When the brain is in a hypoxic-ischemic state caused by prolonged birth asphyxia, the brain is not only deprived of oxygen, it is also deprived of glucose and other nutrients.

Waste removal is also impaired. Waste remains in the cells, resulting in additional brain cell impairments. In general, the longer the brain is in a hypoxic-ischemic state, the more severe the brain injury will be.

The degree of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the baby depends on the following:

  • The severity of the birth asphyxia
  • How long the asphyxia lasts
  • The baby’s age and reserves
  • The medical management of the baby during and after birth

Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia: The Side Effects of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE)

If the birth asphyxia is severe enough to injure the brain, the baby will usually develop hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) soon after birth. HIE usually starts to occur during the birthing process, with problems such as seizures and poor feeding starting to occur shortly after delivery. HIE is a brain injury that can progress to permanent brain damage and long-term conditions, such as cerebral palsy.

Clinical signs of HIE in babies:

  • Seizures
  • Hypotonia, in which the baby is limp and floppy.
  • Poor feeding
  • Depressed level of consciousness, in which the baby is not alert.
  • Multiple organ problems involving the lungs, liver, heart, intestines, etc.
  • Poor brain stem reflexes such as breathing problems, an abnormal response to light, blood pressure and heart problems.

Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is also the most common cause of neonatal seizures. Seizures must be quickly diagnosed and treated because they can advance the spread of brain injury. It is also very important that the medical team be aware of any other problems the baby is having, so that they can provide proper treatment. For example, babies experiencing heart problems often require cardiac drugs. Babies with breathing problems may need breathing tubes and breathing machines. Failure to properly manage a baby’s heart, blood pressure, and breathing can cause further brain injury and worsen the long-term effects of birth asphyxia.

Premature babies may not show any of the signs that full-term babies do. One reason for this is the fact that the nervous systems of premature and full term babies are different. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in a baby born preterm may be silent, with the baby having few or no obvious signs.

HIE usually involves damage to the basal ganglia and watershed regions of the brain, but sometimes also includes periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). PVL usually occurs in premature babies, but it can also sometimes develop in term babies.


Treatment: Hypothermia Therapy Can Halt HIE and Improve the Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia

Therapeutic hypothermia; Hypothermia therapy; Neonatal Head Cooling; Brain Cooling; Body Cooling; Hypothermia Treatment; Cool Cap

A baby receiving head cooling (hypothermia therapy) for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

It is now standard of care for babies diagnosed with HIE to receive hypothermia therapy (brain cooling). Doctors must administer hypothermia therapy within six hours of the time the birth asphyxia occurred. This means a baby with HIE must be cooled within six hours of labor and delivery.

Research shows that hypothermia therapy halts almost every injurious process that starts to occur when a baby’s brain experiences an oxygen-depriving insult. During the treatment, the baby’s body temperature is cooled to a few degrees below normal for 72 hours. Cooling the brain in this way has been shown to prevent cerebral palsy or reduce the severity of the condition. Properly administering hypothermia treatment on a baby with HIE is critical for preventing or improving the long-term effects of birth asphyxia.

Hypothermia Treatment Can Halt Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) and Improve the Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia

For more information on hypothermia therapy, please visit our pages below:


Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia

Many babies who experience birth asphyxia are diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy shortly after birth. Not all children with HIE end up with permanent brain damage. Some children will not experience any long-term effects of birth asphyxia or any latent problems from HIE. Babies who have brain damage caused by birth asphyxia or HIE may develop:

Basal ganglia and infant brain damage - birth injuryThe long-term effects of birth asphyxia depend on the part of the brain injured and the severity of the injury. When a baby experiences severe or total birth asphyxia, also called  acute profound asphyxia, the part of the brain injured is typically the deep gray matter.

When asphyxia is abrupt and severe (acute near total asphyxia), deep brain structures are usually damaged. These include the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. The long-term effects of birth asphyxia will be more severe in these instances.

When the baby experiences asphyxia that is moderate to severe and relatively prolonged (acute profound), injury will usually be seen in the cerebral cortex as well as the deep brain structures, particularly the thalami, hippocampi, putamen, and dorsal part of the midbrain.

If the asphyxia is partial and prolonged(usually lasting for more than 30 minutes), there will mainly be cortical injury in the watershed and parasagittal regions of the brain, which are areas that do not have direct arterial blood supply. This can involve both gray and white matter. When a baby has periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), injury is often seen in the watershed zones in the periventricular region.

Babies can also experience partial prolonged asphyxia along with acute profound asphyxia, which causes a mixed brain injury pattern of HIE.

When a baby has hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, hypoxic-ischemic lesions and other evidence of brain damage are often eventually detected with brain scans. Depending on the nature of the birth asphyxia and the condition of the baby, lesions may be on any part of the brain mentioned above (and others), such as the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter.


Predicting the Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia Based on Location of Brain Damage

The extent and location of the brain damage can help doctors predict the long-term effects of birth asphyxia, as well as what types of lasting problems the child may have. Listed below are areas of the brain, and summaries of which bodily functions these areas help control. The three major parts of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem, all of which contain both gray and white matter.

The Cerebrum

HIE and Damage to the Major Lobes of the Cerebrum - Frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, and temporal lobeThe largest part of the brain, the cerebrum, contains nerve centers that control movement, cognition, reasoning, memory, perception, judgment, and decision-making. The surface of the cerebrum is called the cerebral cortex, which consists of multiple layers of neurons. Neurons are critical brain cells that process and transmit information via electrical and chemical signals, and they connect to each other and form the core of the nervous system. The neuron layers sit on top of a large portion of the brain’s white matter. White matter (along with neurons) helps transmit messages throughout the largest parts of the brain. The cerebrum includes the basal ganglia and hippocampus.

Frontal Lobe of the Cerebrum

This lobe is responsible for voluntary movement and planning. It contains the motor cortex, which controls motor function (movement). The portions of the motor cortex near the top of the head control movement of the legs and feet, and the lowest parts of the motor cortex control the muscles of the face and mouth. The frontal lobe also plays a critical role in intelligence and personality; in fact, researchers think it is the most important lobe for these functions.

Parietal Lobe of the Cerebrum

This lobe is behind the frontal lobe and contains the somatosensory cortex; it is responsible for feeling touch on certain parts of the body. For example, the part of the lobe closest to the top of the head is responsible for feeling touch on the legs and feet. Specific functions associated with the parietal lobe include comprehension of pain, pressure, heat, cold, and touch, as well as appreciation of form.

Temporal Lobe of the Cerebrum

The lobe at the side of the head is called the temporal lobe. An important region of this lobe is the auditory cortex – which is connected with the ears and plays a major role in hearing. Specific functions associated with the temporal lobe include hearing, memories, fear, and some speech and language behavior.

Occipital Lobe of the Cerebrum

The occipital lobe is at the back of the head and contains the visual cortex, which receives information from the eyes and controls vision. Specific functions associated with the occipital lobe include complex processing of vision, reading, and relating vision to other sensory experiences.

The Cerebellum

Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy and Damage to the CerebellumThe cerebellum is a tightly folded, continuous thin layer of tissue that sits on top of a large amount of white matter. It contains a fluid-filled ventricle at the base, and at the microscopic level, there are 4 deep cerebellar nuclei embedded in the white matter. Indeed, there are many types of neurons that form a complex network with massive signal-producing capability.

The cerebellum plays a major role in motor control (muscle control). This region of the brain does not initiate movement, but it greatly contributes to coordination of muscle movement, balance, timing, and precision. The cerebellum also controls a child’s sense of position; a serious injury to the cerebellum can greatly impact a child’s ability to know where her arms and legs are in space. Damage to this part of the brain can affect a child’s ability to walk, run, maintain balance, and have normal muscle tone. It can also impact a child’s fine motor function, such as the ability to hold a piece of cereal. In addition, the cerebellum is involved in some cognitive functions, such as language and attention.

The Brain Stem

Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) and Brainstem DamageThe brain stem helps regulate critical bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It is also involved in relaying information from the cerebrum and cerebellum to the rest of the body through the spinal cord. The nerve connections of the motor and sensory systems in the main regions of the brain travel to the rest of the body through the brain stem. Not only does the brain stem regulate heart and lung functions, it also controls the central nervous system and plays a major role maintaining consciousness and regulating the sleep cycle.

The brain stem has numerous fiber tracts that carry nerve impulses from the brain to the spinal cord. It also contains numerous areas of nuclei, which are groups of brain cells that have specialized functions. The diencephalon, pons, midbrain, and medulla oblongata make up the brainstem.

Diencephalon

The diencephalon includes the thalamus, which relays sensory impulses from one part of the brain to another to be interpreted. Temperature, touch, and pain sensation are affected by the thalamus and cortex. The hypothalamus is also located in the diencephalon, and it plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, fluid, sleep cycle, and hormones. Optic nerves cross over in the thalamus, so injury here can cause a child to have vision problems.

Pons

The pons connects the medulla oblongata and the thalamus. It transmits information between the cerebrum, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. The pons also plays a major role in the depth and frequency of breathing. An injury to the pons can affect a child’s breathing, ability to close the mouth and chew, vision, hearing, and ability to have coordinated motor function in the head, neck, and face.

Midbrain

The midbrain connects the spinal cord and brain stem to the cerebral cortex. It helps control posture, balance, hearing, visual reflexes, temperature, arousal (alertness), the sleep cycle, and coordinated movement of the head and eyes.

Medulla Oblongata

The medulla contains important nuclei that control essential bodily functions, and it is what connects the brain stem to the rest of the brain. Nerve impulses transmitted up and down the body go through the medulla. It has a cardiac center that controls how fast the heart beats, a respiratory center that helps control breathing, and a vasomotor center that affects the dilation or constriction of blood vessels, thereby regulating blood pressure.

Corticospinal Tracts

These tracts connect the body to the motor cortex, conducting impulses from the brain to the spinal cord. The corticospinal tracts control the fine motor function of the limbs, such as precise movements of the fingers and toes.


Award-Winning Birth Injury Attorneys Helping Children with HIE, Cerebral Palsy, and Birth Injuries | Over 100 Years of Joint Experience

Cases involving hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, birth asphyxia and fetal oxygen deprivation require extensive knowledge of both law and medicine. For the best case outcomes, it’s critical to find a law firm that focuses specifically on HIE and birth injury cases. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. was established to exclusively handle HIE and birth trauma cases, and our attorneys have devoted their careers to helping victims of birth trauma receive the care they need. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers is based in Michigan, but we also handle cases in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Washington D.C., Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin, Arkansas, Mississippi, and all other U.S. states. Our legal team can handle cases involving military medical malpractice and federally-funded clinics.

Contact Reiter & Walsh, P.C. today to begin your free case review with our hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy lawyers. Free of charge and obligations, we will answer your legal questions, determine the negligent party, and inform you of your legal options. Our team is available to speak with you to set up an appointment in any of the following ways:

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Phone (toll-free): 888-419-2229
Press the Live Chat button on your browser
Complete Our Online Contact Form


Related Reading: HIE and Birth Injury

Legal Help: Our Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Lawyers & Firm

Medical Information: Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Resources


Video: The Long-Term Effects of Birth Asphyxia

Watch a video of birth injury attorneys Jesse Reiter and Rebecca Walsh discussing birth asphyxia long-term effects.  Birth asphyxia can often be prevented if the baby is quickly delivered at the first signs of distress.  Failure to quickly deliver the baby can cause prolonged oxygen deprivation, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), permanent brain damage, and conditions such as cerebral palsy.

Video: How Is Birth Asphyxia Pronounced?


Understanding HIE - Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Core Terms - Infographic


Sources:

  • Executive summary: Neonatal encephalopathy and neurologic outcome, second edition. Report of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Task Force on Neonatal Encephalopathy. Obstet Gynecol 2014; 123:896.
  • Wu YW, Backstrand KH, Zhao S, et al. Declining diagnosis of birth asphyxia in California: 1991-2000. Pediatrics 2004; 114:1584.
  • Graham EM, Ruis KA, Hartman AL, et al. A systematic review of the role of intrapartum hypoxia-ischemia in the causation of neonatal encephalopathy. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008; 199:587.
  • Thornberg E, Thiringer K, Odeback A, Milsom I. Birth asphyxia: incidence, clinical course and outcome in a Swedish population. Acta Paediatr 1995; 84:927.
  • Lee AC, Kozuki N, Blencowe H, et al. Intrapartum-related neonatal encephalopathy incidence and impairment at regional and global levels for 2010 with trends from 1990. Pediatr Res 2013; 74 Suppl 1:50.
  • Chau V, Poskitt KJ, Miller SP. Advanced neuroimaging techniques for the term newborn with encephalopathy. Pediatr Neurol 2009; 40:181.

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48 replies
  1. yesenia says:

    i have a question about someone whos baby died from asphyxia born at seven months and his weight was 4 pounds 7 ounces it was caused by baby separated from placenta if she was at the time useing meth but babys exams were all normal would she still have a case

  2. Reiter & Walsh Staff says:

    Thank you for your comment, Yesenia. A member of our team has contacted you directly regarding your inquiry.

  3. Reiter & Walsh Staff says:

    Thank you for your comment, Margaret. You have been contacted by a member from the Reiter & Walsh, PC team. Please reach out with any additional questions or concerns.

  4. emily says:

    My child is. Almost 4 years and sh can not form a sentence nor greet peopl back.she is als having trouble following instructions or answering questions.i stil cant enroll her inschool as sh is having trouble speaking

  5. emily says:

    She was born under c section due to fetal distress hand presentation. She can not even undestand when you say what is your name??

  6. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Hi Emily,

    Thank you for your comments on http://www.abclawcenters.com. A member from our team will reach out to you shortly. Please contact our office toll-free at (888) 419-2229 or if you have any other questions.

    Kind Regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  7. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Hi Emily,

    Thank you for your comments on http://www.abclawcenters.com. A member from our team will reach out to you shortly. Please contact our office toll-free at (888) 419-2229 or if you have any other questions.

    Kind Regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  8. Mohammad isa abdullah says:

    To whom may concern .
    My son had Hie grade 2. With cerebral palsy secondary to intrapartum asphyxia. Symptomatic focal epilepsy likely secondary to underlying structural brain damage. Laryngonmalacia. Extreme arching plus fussy
    Now my son 1year ( 21/ 06/ 2016) .once my son start arching .he will cry and arching for whole day ..
    And since my son been dischage from hospital …i sent to Naturopthy treatment .thank god after 4 month of nerve treatment …zero epilepsy .and he was in tube feeding ..and now he enjoy meal like normal infant …without tube. And i am really happy to see my son .even though he still cant walk sit .or crawling ..and almost 5 my son was on zero or totaly not taken any medicitian ..
    And i am looking more progress on coming day by day .woww really excited .with my son progress . I wish and hope to hear from others Hie 2 parents too .

  9. richard says:

    Hi my name is richard,my son is 10 months old with severe asphyxia,and had been diagnos of having secondary epilepsy.a neuthrology have place him on medication,tegretol,but still can’t sit or walk yet.wot are his chances of walking?

  10. Usman Olanike says:

    Hello, my name is Usman Olanike, please I need assistance with regards to my niece, she was born two days ago through C-section, and she have been experiencing seizures, and some of the other signs of birth asphyxia, please what can we do to help her condition?

  11. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Usman,

    Thank you for leaving a comment on abclawcenters.com. We’re sorry to hear about your daughter’s seizures and other signs of birth asphyxia. Please contact our office toll-free at (888) 812-6009 if you would like assistance. A staff member will be emailing you shortly as well.

    Kind regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  12. elizabeth says:

    My son is 7months old cant sit or crawl yet suffered birth asphyxia was resurcitated after birth had convulsions and then went unconsious after
    Cause of asphyxia was due to induced labour with cytotec which was prolonged for 13hours taking care of him as a single mother is too much for me viz am jobless how can i get a good lawyer to sue the hospital that ruined my childs health its too painful for me av just recovered from stress

  13. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Elizabeth,

    Thank you for leaving a comment on abclawcenters.com. We’re sorry to hear about your child’s birth asphyxia. A staff member will be reaching out to you shortly. Please contact our office toll-free at (888) 812-6009 if you would like immediate assistance.

    Kind regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  14. Gaius says:

    my baby suffer asphyxia from birth and was treated.But she is clocking to 9months now,is only one day she laugh but she is feeding very well.I need your advise please.

  15. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear user,

    Thank you for contacting the Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers team. One of our firm’s team members reach out to you shortly via email.

    Kind regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers team

  16. S.Geetha says:

    My son ashwin 10,month old,but he is not sitting or crawling.at the birth time he was kept in ICU for a month breath problem. Doc said this is birth asphyxia. Which level treatment suggests my son

  17. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear S. Geetha,

    Thank you for contacting Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your baby’s developmental delays and breathing difficulties. One of our firm’s team members will be reaching out to you via email shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers Team

  18. Ashley Cramer says:

    My friend was scheduled to have c-section March 29th to have her daughter but tragically was in a fatal car accident March 17th. She was kept alive as long as possible while they attempted emergency c-section asap but there was lack of oxygen and she seized. She had the cooling treatment but as they warmed her the seizures wouldn’t stop. Now they are telling us she will never ever walk, talk, anything. Please tell me what we can do? Is there a chance that in time swelling would decrease and allow some healing of her brain? And is there any way to help her father receive money to help care for her since we understand she has a long hard road??? Please help us if you can we don’t know what to do but don’t want to give up on our sweet girl but feel the hospital is pressuring us to just let her go which just isn’t an option in our minds.

  19. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Ashley,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so very sorry to hear about your story; someone from our team will reach out to you shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  20. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Abhishek,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your daughter’s diagnosis; someone from our team will reach out to assist you shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  21. Martha Hernandez says:

    Hello my baby was born 1 month ago due to placental abruption at 31 weeks, she had to be resuscitated for 12 minutes..and she’s diagnosed with severe HIE..I don’t know if I could have a case for this. I used to take asthma medication and doctor didn’t even bother to see witch medication I was taking..she just said it was OK..

  22. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Ms. Hernandez,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your injury and your baby’s hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy diagnosis; someone from our team will reach out to assist you right away.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  23. Idowu Oluwasegun says:

    Hi, my daughter was diagnose of Birth Asphyxia, and she was breathing through Oxygen for four to five days after her birth under ICU, and we were later discharged three weeks after admittance and since then she has been feeding well and very active to sound and light, i don’t really know weather Asphyxia has really gone cause am really scared of further occurrence of the disease because she plays with her fingers in her mouth with lots of salver.

  24. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Hello, Idowu,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your daughter’s birth asphyxia; someone from our team will be reaching out you to via email shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  25. TAYYABA BIBI says:

    HELLO MY BABY GIRL WAS BORN ON 16 NOVEMBER AND SUFFERED BIRTH ASPHYZIA ..DONT KNOW THE REASON OF ASPHYZIA .my baby was kept in nursury for 13 days and with oxygen mask for few days now my baby is 7 month old respond to light sound and feed milk properly but do not grab toys and do not smile and do not like to sit on his own and by support as well …we r in very tention we love her soo much plzzzzzzz someone help us …do my baby will be able sit walk and talk plllllzzzzz help us i cry all day in the fear of her health ..bye

  26. Noor says:

    Hi my nephew is a month old, suffered from asphyxia, , now better,,, not crying at all.. otherwise conscious ,, no witnessed seizures,, moving all limbs,, initially was on OG tube feeds now taking oral feeds sometimes breastfeeding as well… how long it ll take to become normal, ,, can anything be done ? Are there any stimulation exercises videos or links available online ?

  27. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Hello, Tayyaba,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your daughter’s birth asphyxia; someone from our team will be reaching out you to via email shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  28. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Hello, Noor,

    Thank you for contacting ABC Law Centers. We’re so sorry to hear about your nephew’s asphyxia; someone from our team will be reaching out you to via email shortly.

    All the best,
    The Reiter & Walsh, PC Team

  29. Ramesh Katta says:

    Dear sir,
    My son diagnosed as birth asphyxia.He is 14 year old.Taking medicines since last 6years.But not recovering from seizures. Can u guide me what will be better to control seizures

  30. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Mr. Katta,

    Thank you for reaching out to Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers. We’re very sorry to hear about your son. A member of our team will reach out to you shortly.

    Kind regards,
    Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers

  31. Rukayua says:

    My son is 9 month old, he has a birth axphyxia when I gave birth to him, he cries whenever i put him to sit, he do not like eating or drinking water,but he smiles,recognise things, he stretch his hands to grab things. But i will like to know how to help him develop according to his age, pls help me as they are twin n his sister is now crawling.

  32. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Rukayua,

    Thank you for contacting Reiter & Walsh, P.C. in regards to your child’s condition. A member from our team will reach out shortly.

    Kind regards,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  33. Sandini says:

    Hi am sandini my daughter is 9 month not able to sit .nor crawling she had a birth axphyxia will she be a normal child??

  34. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Sandini,

    Thank you for contacting us in regards to your daughter’s health. A member from our team will reach out to you shortly.

    Thank you,
    The Reiter & Walsh, P.C. Team

  35. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Sandini,

    We’re having trouble reaching you by the email address you provided. Please let us know if you have another email address. You’re also welcome to call our office directly at (248) 593-5100.

    All the best,
    Reiter & Walsh, P.C.

  36. Ranjinder Kaur says:

    my son is born with neonatal asphyxia and HIE2.he has feeding problem and after three months he didn’t smile. he can hold his neck. I am worried about his development. can anyone help me any therapy or exercise to make him more active. he is suffering with developmental delays

  37. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Ranjinder,

    Thank you for reaching out to our team with your questions. Our nurse intake specialist, Lesley, will reach out to you shortly to assist.

    Warm regards,
    Reiter & Walsh, P.C.

  38. Asaad says:

    HELLO MY BABY GIRL WAS BORN ON 16 NOVEMBER AND SUFFERED BIRTH ASPHYZIA ..DONT KNOW THE REASON OF ASPHYZIA .my baby was kept in nursury for 13 days and with oxygen mask for few days now my baby is 2 years old respond to light sound and feed milk properly but do not grab toys and do not smile and do not like to sit on his own and by support as well …we r in very tention we love her soo much plzzzzzzz someone help us …do my baby will be able sit walk and talk plllllzzzzz help us i cry all day in the fear of her health ..bye

  39. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Asaad,

    We’re sorry to hear that your daughter is experiencing medical issues. A member from our team will reach out to you shortly.

    Kind regards,
    The ABC Law Centers Web Team

  40. Tanweer anwar says:

    My baby is 26days .she is in NICU just after birth for birth a ashpexiafor nine days after discharged from NICU HER URINE IS STOPED FOR 24 HRS AFTER that doctor tell ct scan and fond HIE and IVH .again she is admitted in NICU for12 days in between she is diagnised with manjitis and recovered after that again CT scan is done and fond that she is having HIE and severe degree of hydrocephalus what I will do neurologist have told VP shunt is only option .

  41. Balaji says:

    my daughter is a month old, suffered from asphyxia, , now better,,, not crying at all.. otherwise conscious ,, no witnessed seizures,, moving all limbs,, initially was on OG tube feeds now taking oral feeds sometimes breastfeeding as well… how long it ll take to become normal, ,, can anything be done ? Are there any stimulation exercises videos or links available online ?

  42. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Balaji,

    We’re so sorry to hear about your daughter’s injuries. A member of our team will reach out shortly to assist with your questions.

    Warm regards,
    ABC Law Centers

  43. Sohail says:

    Hi!
    My son is 5 days old now and he was full term and was 3.6kg. He was fine untill 15 hours after birth and then we felt some seizure symptoms.

    He was admitted to the hospital and he is in ICU now. Dr said he has birth asphexia. His sugar level was low when he was admitted to the hospital (almost one day old at that time) but now his sugar level is fine. His calcium report is also normal.

    He is not fully recovered from seizure but he is little better now.

    Need you help regarding asphexia effects and is it a serious condition.

    Really worried about my son please help us.

    Thanks!.

  44. Reiter & Walsh, P.C. says:

    Dear Sohail,

    We’re so sorry to hear about your son’s injuries. A member of our team will reach out shortly to assist with your questions.

    Warm regards,
    ABC Law Centers

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