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Dysphagia and cerebral palsy

Dysphagia is a condition characterized by persistent difficulty or pain when swallowing. There are many causes of dysphagia, and people of all ages can suffer from it (1).  Dysphagia is especially common for children with complex medical needs, with an estimated 30-80% of children with developmental disabilities having some form of dysphagia (2). Children with…

Research Shows That Adults with Cerebral Palsy Are At Higher Risk of Mental Health Issues

According to recent research, adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are at higher risk of developing mental health conditions than are adults without CP. Daniel Whitney and colleagues from Michigan Medicine (a healthcare system run by the University of Michigan) published a study (1) that emphasizes the need for increased knowledge of mental health conditions and…

Is cerebral palsy (CP) curable?

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a type of motor disorder characterized by abnormal or involuntary movements. It is often caused by brain damage during or around the time of birth, due to factors such as oxygen deprivation, and is considered a birth injury (1). Many parents want to know if their child’s cerebral palsy can be…

Spotlight on Equine Therapy Programs in Michigan

Looking for a new and exciting activity to get your child involved in this summer? Have you heard about equine therapy? Equine therapy Equine therapy is the therapeutic use of horseback riding to benefit children with a broad range of needs and abilities. Horseback riding skills, balance, and muscle strength are developed through equine therapy….

Recent Research Indicates That 3D Gait Analysis Can Help to Predict Success of Achilles Tendon Lengthening (ATL) Surgery in Children with Cerebral Palsy

Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery can help to treat ‘equinus foot,’ also known as tiptoe walking, which is a common symptom of cerebral palsy (CP). However, many children who have ATL surgery experience overcorrection, and end up walking with a crouch gait. Therefore, it would be valuable to identify individual characteristics that could predict the…

Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Might Not Actually Benefit from Botox Injections Prior to Physiotherapy

Doctors often prescribe botulinum toxin A (botox) injections to patients with cerebral palsy who are ambulatory (able to walk), in order to reduce spasticity. Generally, botox injections are given as part of a combined treatment plan also involving other interventions. However, studies on whether botox injections improve outcomes for children undergoing comprehensive rehabilitation programs have…

Research Suggests Early Postural Training Could Mitigate Symptoms of Cerebral Palsy

People with cerebral palsy (CP) often have problems with postural control, which can interfere with basic activities of daily life such as reaching, sitting, or walking. A lack of information on the developmental trajectory of these postural issues has made it difficult for medical professionals to optimize interventions. However, recent research provides some answers, which…

What’s Vibrational Therapy, and How Can It Help People with Cerebral Palsy?

Many people with cerebral palsy (CP) benefit greatly from physical therapy, which can improve functions such as strength and flexibility, and decrease negative symptoms such as pain. However, people with very severe motor and/or cognitive problems may be unable to follow instructions and perform voluntary exercises. This limits their treatment options outside of pharmacological and…

Scoliosis Surgery Can Improve Quality of Life in Children with Severe Cerebral Palsy

Children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) often develop progressive scoliosis, or abnormal spinal curvature. Scoliosis causes a variety of health issues, such as problems with balance while sitting, pain, and complications affecting function of the lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal system. Spinal fusion surgery has been considered standard of care for children whose scoliosis cannot be…