Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Tummy Talks

Tummy Talks Image

Speech and language can become even more of a sensory experience for your child with some tummy talks. Spread a blanket out on the floor to play this game. Remove your baby’s shirt and lay your baby down on his/her back.

You can start off by gently rubbing your baby’s tummy before diving into tummy talks. Press your face and lips into your baby’s tummy and begin to talk. You can say nursery rhymes, sing, tell stories, or even make up funny words or sounds.

To make things more interesting for your baby, you can vary the pitch and volume of your voice. Once you sit up, you can give your baby some time to anticipate the next ticklish chat before providing more tummy talks.

Avoid talking to loudly, so that you don’t startle your baby. If your baby doesn’t start giggling, tummy chats may not be the right sensory game for your child. Thankfully, there is an abundance of other games you can play together.

Tummy Talks

Tummy Talks Image

Speech and language can become even more of a sensory experience for your child with some tummy talks. Spread a blanket out on the floor to play this game. Remove your baby’s shirt and lay your baby down on his/her back.

You can start off by gently rubbing your baby’s tummy before diving into tummy talks. Press your face and lips into your baby’s tummy and begin to talk. You can say nursery rhymes, sing, tell stories, or even make up funny words or sounds.

To make things more interesting for your baby, you can vary the pitch and volume of your voice. Once you sit up, you can give your baby some time to anticipate the next ticklish chat before providing more tummy talks.

Avoid talking to loudly, so that you don’t startle your baby. If your baby doesn’t start giggling, tummy chats may not be the right sensory game for your child. Thankfully, there is an abundance of other games you can play together.