Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Stuffed Animal Safari

Stuffed Animal Safari Image

Bringing a safari to your baby is a great way to introduce your infant to the animal kingdom. Your baby likely loves to make sounds and as your infant gets closer to talking, he/she will be able to imitate sounds. Being asked to imitate animal noises challenges your baby’s listening and language skills.

To create a safari experience at home, you’ll need a collection of stuffed animals or large pictures of animals. Sit your baby in an infant seat and hold up a stuffed animal or photo for your baby to see. You’ll want to hold up the stuffed animal or photo near your face, so that your baby can see your mouth. Imitate the sound of the animal you’re holding up and wait a few minutes to give your baby some time to produce the same sound. Once your baby has copied the animal noise, you can move on to the next animal.

If you have stuffed animals you can also let your baby pet the animal to excite his/her sense of touch. Avoid making extremely loud animal noises, as this could scare your baby. A stuffed animal zoo is a great precursor to visiting an actual zoo.

Stuffed Animal Safari

Stuffed Animal Safari Image

Bringing a safari to your baby is a great way to introduce your infant to the animal kingdom. Your baby likely loves to make sounds and as your infant gets closer to talking, he/she will be able to imitate sounds. Being asked to imitate animal noises challenges your baby’s listening and language skills.

To create a safari experience at home, you’ll need a collection of stuffed animals or large pictures of animals. Sit your baby in an infant seat and hold up a stuffed animal or photo for your baby to see. You’ll want to hold up the stuffed animal or photo near your face, so that your baby can see your mouth. Imitate the sound of the animal you’re holding up and wait a few minutes to give your baby some time to produce the same sound. Once your baby has copied the animal noise, you can move on to the next animal.

If you have stuffed animals you can also let your baby pet the animal to excite his/her sense of touch. Avoid making extremely loud animal noises, as this could scare your baby. A stuffed animal zoo is a great precursor to visiting an actual zoo.