Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Sticky Toy Excavation

Sticky Toy Excavation Image

At this age, your baby has likely mastered the ability to pick up toys. You can make the task of picking up toys more challenging by adding sticky contact paper to the equation.

Take a two foot sheet of contact paper and place it on the ground with the sticky side up. Peel back the protective layer and gather a collection of toys to place on the paper. With the toys on the paper you can call your baby over.

Tell your child you’re having difficulty getting the toys off of the paper and ask them to help. You can watch your child’s problem solving skills at work as they attempt to lift the toys off of the paper.

Watch your baby at all times to make sure he/she doesn’t end up accidentally covering his/her face with the contact paper. If your child gets frustrated with the task, you can help and illustrate how to release one of the toys from the contact paper. This activity is not only a great sensory experience, but a good problem solving activity as well.

Sticky Toy Excavation

Sticky Toy Excavation Image

At this age, your baby has likely mastered the ability to pick up toys. You can make the task of picking up toys more challenging by adding sticky contact paper to the equation.

Take a two foot sheet of contact paper and place it on the ground with the sticky side up. Peel back the protective layer and gather a collection of toys to place on the paper. With the toys on the paper you can call your baby over.

Tell your child you’re having difficulty getting the toys off of the paper and ask them to help. You can watch your child’s problem solving skills at work as they attempt to lift the toys off of the paper.

Watch your baby at all times to make sure he/she doesn’t end up accidentally covering his/her face with the contact paper. If your child gets frustrated with the task, you can help and illustrate how to release one of the toys from the contact paper. This activity is not only a great sensory experience, but a good problem solving activity as well.