Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Shape Trace

Shape Trace Image

Shape tracing is a great activity for kids to develop important pre-writing skills and abilities. Tracing shapes helps babies learn to develop the ability to draw vertical, horizontal, and curved lines.

To set up the shape tracing activity, you’ll need a piece of paper with printed outlines of shapes on it, a tray or bin to put the paper in, a crayon, and a sensory tracing medium (rice, couscous, quinoa, or sand). Start by placing the paper on the tray and scattering the sensory medium over the paper. If you’d like your paper to last for more than one play occasion, you can laminate it.

With the sensory medium covering the shapes, you can then ask your baby to trace the outline of the shapes in the medium with their fingers. You may have to move some of the medium to allow your child to see a starting point for each shape. After the outlines of each shape have been revealed, you can ask your child to scoop out the middle part of each shape so that the entire shape is visible.

With the shapes visible, you can then ask your baby to color in each shape using the crayon. While performing this game, you can extend the learning activity by quizzing your child on the names of the shapes and which shapes are relatively bigger and smaller in size. Tracing shapes is a great learning activity and adding a sensory medium only multiplies the fun. However, it’s advised not to try this with children under the age of three, as they will attempt to eat the dry quinoa, couscous, rice, or sand.

Shape Trace

Shape Trace Image

Shape tracing is a great activity for kids to develop important pre-writing skills and abilities. Tracing shapes helps babies learn to develop the ability to draw vertical, horizontal, and curved lines.

To set up the shape tracing activity, you’ll need a piece of paper with printed outlines of shapes on it, a tray or bin to put the paper in, a crayon, and a sensory tracing medium (rice, couscous, quinoa, or sand). Start by placing the paper on the tray and scattering the sensory medium over the paper. If you’d like your paper to last for more than one play occasion, you can laminate it.

With the sensory medium covering the shapes, you can then ask your baby to trace the outline of the shapes in the medium with their fingers. You may have to move some of the medium to allow your child to see a starting point for each shape. After the outlines of each shape have been revealed, you can ask your child to scoop out the middle part of each shape so that the entire shape is visible.

With the shapes visible, you can then ask your baby to color in each shape using the crayon. While performing this game, you can extend the learning activity by quizzing your child on the names of the shapes and which shapes are relatively bigger and smaller in size. Tracing shapes is a great learning activity and adding a sensory medium only multiplies the fun. However, it’s advised not to try this with children under the age of three, as they will attempt to eat the dry quinoa, couscous, rice, or sand.