Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Sensory Tubs

Sensory Tubs Image

Creating a sensory tub is a cheap an easy way to entertain a child for hours on end. To make a sensory tub, you’ll need a large plastic container and a tub filling of your choice.

You can fill the tub with a number of different materials, each providing different textures and smells for unique sensory experiences. Possible tub fillings include:

  • Cooked spaghetti
  • Corn kernals
  • Ice cubes
  • Baby food
  • Wet newspaper
  • Tissue paper
  • Bubbles
  • Play dough
  • Dry pasta
  • Corn meal

Once you’ve filled the tub with your materials of choice, you can place the tub in front of your baby to play with. Your child will enjoy rummaging through the tub. The various textures, smells, and sounds, will provide unique sensory experiences. For non-edible items such as bubbles and play dough, you’ll want to keep an eye on your child to ensure they don’t eat any of the tub’s contents. You can mix things up by switching out the tub’s contents each time you play.

Sensory Tubs

Sensory Tubs Image

Creating a sensory tub is a cheap an easy way to entertain a child for hours on end. To make a sensory tub, you’ll need a large plastic container and a tub filling of your choice.

You can fill the tub with a number of different materials, each providing different textures and smells for unique sensory experiences. Possible tub fillings include:

  • Cooked spaghetti
  • Corn kernals
  • Ice cubes
  • Baby food
  • Wet newspaper
  • Tissue paper
  • Bubbles
  • Play dough
  • Dry pasta
  • Corn meal

Once you’ve filled the tub with your materials of choice, you can place the tub in front of your baby to play with. Your child will enjoy rummaging through the tub. The various textures, smells, and sounds, will provide unique sensory experiences. For non-edible items such as bubbles and play dough, you’ll want to keep an eye on your child to ensure they don’t eat any of the tub’s contents. You can mix things up by switching out the tub’s contents each time you play.