Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Mystery Box Game

Mystery Box Game Image

Kids love a mystery and it isn’t very difficult to create one. All you need is a small box (shoe box, shipping box, etc.), paper bag, tape, and a series of non-breakable items familiar to your child (shoes, toys, books).

Collect all of the familiar items you’d like to place in the mystery box and put the items in a paper bag where your child cannot see them. Have your child close his/her eyes and take one of the items out from the paper bag. Place the item into the box and tape the box shut.

You can now hand the box to your child and have your child open his/her eyes. Give your baby time to shake the box, feel the weight, and think about what could be inside. If your child is having difficulty guessing, you can provide clues. Once your child guesses the correct item, you can open the box and reveal the item.

You can continue to play the mystery game until you’ve run out of items to put into the box. If you want to make things really challenging, you can limit the number of guesses allowed for each round.

Mystery Box Game

Mystery Box Game Image

Kids love a mystery and it isn’t very difficult to create one. All you need is a small box (shoe box, shipping box, etc.), paper bag, tape, and a series of non-breakable items familiar to your child (shoes, toys, books).

Collect all of the familiar items you’d like to place in the mystery box and put the items in a paper bag where your child cannot see them. Have your child close his/her eyes and take one of the items out from the paper bag. Place the item into the box and tape the box shut.

You can now hand the box to your child and have your child open his/her eyes. Give your baby time to shake the box, feel the weight, and think about what could be inside. If your child is having difficulty guessing, you can provide clues. Once your child guesses the correct item, you can open the box and reveal the item.

You can continue to play the mystery game until you’ve run out of items to put into the box. If you want to make things really challenging, you can limit the number of guesses allowed for each round.