Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Guess The Texture

Guess The Texture Image

Preschool-age children learn better when their senses are engaged. Having your child guess textures does just that. Take 6 to 8 brown paper bags and fill each bag with a different textured item. Items could include:

  • Sponges
  • Clay
  • Sandpaper
  • Sand
  • Flowers
  • Leaves
  • Rubber Bands
  • Paper clips
  • Whipped cream
  • Pasta noodles
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Shaving cream

Once the bags are filled, place them on the floor or table between you and your child. Ask your child to stick his/her hand in each bag and feel around without looking. Before guessing what the item is, you should have your child describe how the item feels with as much detail as possible. Once your baby has correctly guessed the item in the bag you can reveal the item and move on to the next bag.

When choosing items for your bags, make sure they’re items that can be handled safely. Items that are fragile, such as glass items should not be placed in the paper bags.

Guess The Texture

Guess The Texture Image

Preschool-age children learn better when their senses are engaged. Having your child guess textures does just that. Take 6 to 8 brown paper bags and fill each bag with a different textured item. Items could include:

  • Sponges
  • Clay
  • Sandpaper
  • Sand
  • Flowers
  • Leaves
  • Rubber Bands
  • Paper clips
  • Whipped cream
  • Pasta noodles
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Shaving cream

Once the bags are filled, place them on the floor or table between you and your child. Ask your child to stick his/her hand in each bag and feel around without looking. Before guessing what the item is, you should have your child describe how the item feels with as much detail as possible. Once your baby has correctly guessed the item in the bag you can reveal the item and move on to the next bag.

When choosing items for your bags, make sure they’re items that can be handled safely. Items that are fragile, such as glass items should not be placed in the paper bags.