Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Friendly Fingers

Friendly Fingers Image

One puppet character is great, but five finger characters makes for even more fun. Gather a clean, light colored glove and a collection of permanent felt-tip pens. Use the pens to draw funny faces on the fingertips of the glove.

Once you have your characters, you can sit your baby down and slip the glove onto your hand. Begin talking to your baby, using different voices for each finger character. You can perform plays and sing songs to keep your baby happily entertained.

You can encourage your baby master control over his/her fingers by allowing your child to touch and interact with the finger friends. However, you’ll want to be careful that your baby doesn’t try to put the glove in his/her mouth, because the marker can come off.

Friendly Fingers

Friendly Fingers Image

One puppet character is great, but five finger characters makes for even more fun. Gather a clean, light colored glove and a collection of permanent felt-tip pens. Use the pens to draw funny faces on the fingertips of the glove.

Once you have your characters, you can sit your baby down and slip the glove onto your hand. Begin talking to your baby, using different voices for each finger character. You can perform plays and sing songs to keep your baby happily entertained.

You can encourage your baby master control over his/her fingers by allowing your child to touch and interact with the finger friends. However, you’ll want to be careful that your baby doesn’t try to put the glove in his/her mouth, because the marker can come off.