Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Disappearing Act

Disappearing Act Image

As an infant, your child will spend most of his/her time trying to figure out and understand the world. Creating a disappearing act is a great way to help. To make toys disappear, you’ll need a collection of colorful toys and something to cover them with (blanket, towel, cloth, etc.)

You can start by seating your baby comfortably in an infant seat. Take out one of the toys and hold it in front of your baby. You may also want to talk while you do so to ensure you have your baby’s attention. You can then cover the toy with the cloth while your baby is watching.

At this age, a child is not able to grasp depth or dimension, so it will appear as if the toy is disappearing and reappearing out of nowhere. Sudden disappearance can be upsetting for some children. If this is the case, you can cover the toy slower to show your baby what you’re actually doing.

After covering the toy, you can wait a few seconds before uncovering it and continue to repeat the cycle of covering and uncovering. Avoid waiting too long to uncover the toy, as the wait may cause your child to lose interest. To keep things exciting, you can also switch up the toys you use. Making toys disappear is an extremely cheap and easy way to excite your baby’s senses.

Disappearing Act

Disappearing Act Image

As an infant, your child will spend most of his/her time trying to figure out and understand the world. Creating a disappearing act is a great way to help. To make toys disappear, you’ll need a collection of colorful toys and something to cover them with (blanket, towel, cloth, etc.)

You can start by seating your baby comfortably in an infant seat. Take out one of the toys and hold it in front of your baby. You may also want to talk while you do so to ensure you have your baby’s attention. You can then cover the toy with the cloth while your baby is watching.

At this age, a child is not able to grasp depth or dimension, so it will appear as if the toy is disappearing and reappearing out of nowhere. Sudden disappearance can be upsetting for some children. If this is the case, you can cover the toy slower to show your baby what you’re actually doing.

After covering the toy, you can wait a few seconds before uncovering it and continue to repeat the cycle of covering and uncovering. Avoid waiting too long to uncover the toy, as the wait may cause your child to lose interest. To keep things exciting, you can also switch up the toys you use. Making toys disappear is an extremely cheap and easy way to excite your baby’s senses.