Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Bug Hunting

Bug Hunting Image

As a preschooler, your child likely is fascinated by bugs. You can feed that fascination by going on a bug hunt together! All you’ll need is a magnifying glass, pencil and notepad, or your phone.

Head out to a local park and walk through the grass searching for bugs. Once you’ve found some insects, hold the magnifying glass out to let your child have a better look. Ask your child to draw the insect or take a picture using your phone camera. You can continue to do this until you’ve successfully hunted and documented a sizable collection of bugs.

Once you return home you can have your child analyze the drawings or photos. Lay them all out on a table and ask your child to identify features that are similar or different between each bug. This activity will help your child learn more about the insects we share this world with.

While your on a bug hunt, remember that not all bugs are friendly. Keep an eye out to ensure your child doesn’t end up near an insect that bites or stings. You’ll also want to avoid poison ivy and poison oak. Nevertheless, bug hunting can be a fun activity for both you and your child.

Bug Hunting

Bug Hunting Image

As a preschooler, your child likely is fascinated by bugs. You can feed that fascination by going on a bug hunt together! All you’ll need is a magnifying glass, pencil and notepad, or your phone.

Head out to a local park and walk through the grass searching for bugs. Once you’ve found some insects, hold the magnifying glass out to let your child have a better look. Ask your child to draw the insect or take a picture using your phone camera. You can continue to do this until you’ve successfully hunted and documented a sizable collection of bugs.

Once you return home you can have your child analyze the drawings or photos. Lay them all out on a table and ask your child to identify features that are similar or different between each bug. This activity will help your child learn more about the insects we share this world with.

While your on a bug hunt, remember that not all bugs are friendly. Keep an eye out to ensure your child doesn’t end up near an insect that bites or stings. You’ll also want to avoid poison ivy and poison oak. Nevertheless, bug hunting can be a fun activity for both you and your child.