Sensory Play Catalog

Sensory play is crucial for a child’s development. Sensory play can help your baby develop a better sense of  vision, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. While a child with cerebral palsy or other various disabilities may experience an abnormal degree of sensory processing, sensory play is still important.

Regardless of limitation, there are plenty of play ideas you and your child can engage in together. Reiter & Walsh ABC Law Centers has compiled a catalog of sensory play ideas for children of varying ages and levels of ability. Browse the catalog to find fun activities that are sure to excite and captivate your baby.

Sensory-Friendly Play Ideas for Families

Blind Taste Test

Blind Taste Test Image

Is your child a very picky eater? You may be able to get him/her to be more adventurous by turning eating into a sensory game. Not only is this game fun, it also requires next to nothing to set up! All you’ll need to play is a bandanna or article of clothing to cover your child’s eyes with and an assortment of food of your choosing.

Start by sitting your child down and tying the bandanna or shirt around his/her head as a blindfold. Next, create your taste testing platter. Food items for the platter could include:

  • Blue berries
  • Tangerine slices
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chocolate
  • Cheese slices
  • Bread slices
  • Watermelon
  • Marshmellows

Feed your child the food items one by one and wait as they use the taste and texture of a food item to guess what it may be. Keep a tally of the number of correct guesses, so that you can report the score back to your child. Even if your preschooler isn’t a picky eater, a blind taste test is still a great way to expose all children to new types of foods.

Blind Taste Test

Blind Taste Test Image

Is your child a very picky eater? You may be able to get him/her to be more adventurous by turning eating into a sensory game. Not only is this game fun, it also requires next to nothing to set up! All you’ll need to play is a bandanna or article of clothing to cover your child’s eyes with and an assortment of food of your choosing.

Start by sitting your child down and tying the bandanna or shirt around his/her head as a blindfold. Next, create your taste testing platter. Food items for the platter could include:

  • Blue berries
  • Tangerine slices
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Chocolate
  • Cheese slices
  • Bread slices
  • Watermelon
  • Marshmellows

Feed your child the food items one by one and wait as they use the taste and texture of a food item to guess what it may be. Keep a tally of the number of correct guesses, so that you can report the score back to your child. Even if your preschooler isn’t a picky eater, a blind taste test is still a great way to expose all children to new types of foods.