In Norway, Rates of Cerebral Palsy Decline as Perinatal Healthcare Improves

Many cases of cerebral palsy (CP) are caused by complications that occur around the time of delivery (these are known as birth injuries). Based on this, Sandra Julsen Hollung and colleagues hypothesized that improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care could decrease the rate of cerebral palsy. Studying the Impact of Healthcare Standards on Cerebral Palsy…

New VaPor Model Provides More Details About the Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia for HIE

What Is Therapeutic Hypothermia? Therapeutic hypothermia has proven effectiveness in minimizing permanent brain damage after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, or HIE. HIE is a type of brain injury caused by a lack of oxygenated blood flow. In infants, it can occur due to complications in late pregnancy, birth, or the neonatal period. What Do We Already Know…

New Treatment for Cerebral Palsy: M2 Macrophage Transplantation Improves Motor and Cognitive Function

Cell transplantation is a promising new avenue for treating cerebral palsy (CP). Previous research has shown that stem cell therapy can help children with cerebral palsy; a study published this month indicates that treatment with macrophages may also be effective.  Essentially, macrophages are cells that can repair damaged brain tissue and blood vessels, thereby enhancing…

Improving Neurological Outcomes of HIE: Monosialoganglioside Treatment

Thus far, the most effective medical intervention for infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is hypothermia therapy, or cooling treatment. When administered very shortly after birth or the oxygen-depriving incident, this therapy can reverse brain damage and minimize (or in some cases prevent) permanent harm. However, hypothermia therapy is not always effective, and additional solutions for…

Hypothermia Therapy May Be Effective 6-24 Hours After Birth

Currently, the only available treatment for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), besides supportive care and therapy to mitigate the symptoms, is hypothermia therapy. This involves cooling a baby down to a below-normal temperature in order to allow the brain to recover from a hypoxic-ischemic injury and limit the spread of damage. Hypothermia therapy is known to reduce…

New MRI Scoring System May Help Counsel Parents of Kids with HIE

New research released June 16, 2017 in Pediatric Neurology validates a new clinical MRI scoring system for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). This new scoring system can help medical practitioners more accurately counsel parents about what their child’s short- and long-term outcomes may look like and help guide treatment and therapy decisions for the child. MRI Injury…

Complications at Birth, Including Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE), Tied to Autism Risk

Oxygen Deprivation at Birth, Preeclampsia, Other Factors Increased Autism Risk Up to 44% New research in the American Journal of Perinatology conducted by Kaiser-Permanente researchers has tied complications such as birth asphyxia (oxygen deprivation at birth, formally known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, or HIE) to autism spectrum disorders (ASD), a variety of neurodevelopmental abnormalities characterized by…

Why Babies with HIE May Have Multi-Organ Failure

Some babies with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) may have other health issues relating to the failure or dysfunction of other organs, such as the kidneys, liver or intestines. Why is this? Babies who have been impacted by birth asphyxia sometimes demonstrate a reflex called the “mammalian diving reflex.” When oxygen supply is limited around the time…